Category: CloudHub

Ross Mason on Thursday, September 19, 2013

NoSQL and Big Data connectors for Mule

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In the past few months, you may have noticed that we have regularly announced the release of new Mule connectors for data-stores. Two main forces are at play behind the need for these types of data-stores:

  • – The need to deal in realtime or near-realtime with the vast amounts of data “web-scale” applications can generate,
  • BASE vs ACID – The need to scale reliably in the unreliable environment that is the cloud leading to the relaxation of RDBM’s ACID properties (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation and Durability) towards BASE ones (Basically Available, Soft state, Eventually consistent).

So where is Mule coming into play in this equation you might ask?

Mule can help integrating such NoSQL data-stores with the resources that produce and consume data. This integration goes way beyond than simply establishing protocol connectivity: thanks to Mule queuing, routing and transformation infrastructure, important tasks like data capture and curation can be achieved. Mule can also be used to expose APIs that make either raw data or processed data available for use in custom applications.

In your daily work as an integration developer you’re working with different kinds of patterns, even if you’re not aware of it.

Since Mule is based on EIP (Enterprise Integration ) you’re most definitely using patterns when using Mule.

One of those patterns that seems to raise a lot of questions is the “fork and join pattern”. The purpose of the fork and join pattern is to send a request to different targets, in parallel, and wait for a aggregated response from all the targets.

David Dossot on Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Mule and Redis get a web bug

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The recently upgraded Redis connector for Mule allows you to interact with this data-store in a convenient manner. This blog is a tutorial that you can follow in order to get your feet wet with , if you don’t know it already, or Mule, if you have experience and want to see how they both can work together.

In this tutorial, we will build a very simple back-end that captures page visit count for identified users via a web bug. This example illustrates the usage of Mule as a tool for capturing events and routing them to NoSQL storage for later analysis.

It’s hard to believe that MuleSoft’s Fall 2013 Summit series is less than a month away.  Summit is one of the most rewarding things I do all year.  For me, it’s an opportunity to talk to many of our customers, partners and prospects about the integration challenges they face and the innovative ways they’re using our solutions to address them. Summit is a great opportunity to share best practices, lessons learned, and network with other like-minded members of the MuleSoft community.

Mariano Gonzalez on Wednesday, August 28, 2013

OAuth 2 just got a bit easier

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Ever since Devkit made its first entry into the Mule family, a big variety of OAuth enabled Cloud Connectors were made available. Salesforce, Facebook, Twitter, Dropbox, LinkedIn and Google Apps suite are just some examples of the APIs we’ve connected to using that support.

When we started thinking about the August 2013 release we decided to take it one step forward and make it easier than ever. And now that Mule 3.5-andes is available on , you’ll be able to leverage all these improvements into your integrations. On Premise users will also be able to use when the final version of Mule 3.5.0 is released as GA.

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Just when you thought it couldn’t get any better, it got better. Dataloader.io, the most popular Salesforce data loading solution on the AppExchange now supports importing and exporting of files to and from Dropbox!

dataloader.io and dropbox

Data loading aficionados can now quickly and easily import or export data directly to and from their Dropbox account. By simply entering your Dropbox credentials, users can make Dropbox their source for CSV files. Similarly, exporting to Dropbox is as easy as choosing Dropbox as your connection and destination folder from a tab. Then, by following the standard steps to import and export data with dataloader.io, you’ll be up and running in no time – it’s that simple!

Ross Mason on Monday, July 29, 2013

Raspberry Pi gets an API

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In the Internet of things no device is an island. And while Raspberry Pi devices are pretty cool on their own adding an API makes them a lot more interesting. We have been playing around with Raspberry for a while now and have a small distribution of Mule, called ‘ Edge’ that happily runs on small embeddable devices like the Raspberry Pi.  These ARM-based devices are taking the world by storm since they are lower powered, low cost and can be embedded into small hubs to control other things like lightbulbs, or be used inside anything from PoS kiosks to gas pumps to cars to medical devices.

You may have read about our mountain trek, new release cycle, and the increased pace of delivering. We’ve  climbed our first mountain and we’re happy to announce the availability of our first release in our trek: Andes! This delivers major usability improvements around our platform, new connectivity to applications such as Marketo and ZenDesk, and expanded API management capabilities. We’ll summarize what’s new for you here and we’ll be doing deeper dives over the coming days for you to learn more.

Introduction

After creating a basic Mule App, you might be wondering how to automate the process of deploying a Mule App to . In this post, we are introducing a Maven plugin that enables that use case. As a result a Mule App will be deployed automatically to after a Maven build. This is achieved using the goal cloudhub-deploy from the Mule AppKit Maven Plugin.

In a ideal development workflow, each time the project builds the Mule Application will be deployed to the cloud providing a cutting instance that can be used for QA of the latest snapshot. Both Bamboo or Jenkins can be configured in order to run Maven and deploy the Mule App to CloudHub.

It’s pretty common to hear and read about how everything in the IT business is going “as a service…”. So you start hearing about Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Serivce (PaaS) and even Integration Platform as a Service (iPaaS, which is where our very own CloudHub platform plays on). But what about data?