Category: Mule ESB

You may have read about our mountain trek, new release cycle, and the increased pace of delivering. We’ve  climbed our first mountain and we’re happy to announce the availability of our first release in our trek: Andes! This delivers major usability improvements around our platform, new connectivity to applications such as Marketo and ZenDesk, and expanded API management capabilities. We’ll summarize what’s new for you here and we’ll be doing deeper dives over the coming days for you to learn more.

john.demic on Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Getting started with JPA and Mule

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Working with managed entities in Mule applications can be difficult.  Since the session is not propagated between message processors, transformers are typically needed to produce an entity from a message’s payload, pass it to a component for processing, then serialize it back to an un-proxied representation for further processing.

Transactions have been complicated too.  Its difficult to coordinate a transaction between multiple components that are operating with JPA entity payloads.  Finally the lack of support for JPA queries makes it difficult to  load objects without working with raw SQL and the JDBC transport.

In the new enterprise, the “one big database” paradigm is being progressively eroded as it becomes more apparent that the ACID qualities of traditional SQL are not always needed, and can actually get in the way of massive scalability. In order to respond to the imperative of cloud deployments, new data stores have emerged.

One of them is Riak, a highly-available, fault-tolerant and scalable distributed key-value store built by Basho Technologies, Inc. on the design principles laid out in the famous Amazon Dynamo paper. One of the key features of Riak is that it “embraces failure” in the sense that, instead of sweeping under the carpet the problematic scenarios (like net-splits), it provides developers with the tools needed to deal with these issues as part of the normal operation mode instead of a leaving them to a (seldom addressed) failure mode. As such, data in Riak is said to be “eventually consistent” because it is only when all the pending replications have been done and the related conflicts have been resolved that data is consistent.

The new Riak Connector for Mule allows you to interact with this data store from your Mule applications, opening the door to new integration scenarios. Let’s review an example of such a scenario.

On my previous 3-part blog, I showed how Mule ESB can be used to service-enable and orchestrate traditional on-premise technologies like an Oracle database and IBM Websphere MQ. Using Mule ESB, we created a service that accessed employee information from an Oracle database table and transmitted this to IBM WebSphere MQ. An observant customer I was showing this to noticed a security flaw with how sensitive employee information was being transmitted in plain text and also asked how the employee record can be sent to SalesForce.com. This blog will show how these can be easily addressed using MuleSoft’s AnyPoint Platform. We’ll make use of the PGP encryption features from AnyPoint Enterprise Security to encrypt the data before sending it to WebSphere MQ. Then, we’ll create another message flow to retrieve this message, decrypt it and send it to SalesForce.com using the AnyPoint Connector for SalesForce.com.

Mule has a very extensive support for data stores, which covers pretty much the whole spectrum of what’s available out there, from key/value stores to document-oriented databases. The only piece that was missing in the puzzle was connectivity to a graph database: with the introduction of the Neo4j connector, the gap is now closed.

Popularized by the advent of social media, the need for efficiently storing, indexing, traversing and querying graphs of objects has become prominent in less than a decade. During this time, Neo4j has risen to the number one graph database on the market, with successful deployments across all types of industries and a strong commitment to open source.

The new connector, presented in this blog, allows Mule users to leverage the incredibly rich API that Neo4j offers with convenient configuration elements. Read on to discover a simple example built with this connector.

Have you already tried the Visual Flow Debugger? It’s one of the new shiny features that comes with Mule Studio Enterprise 3.4. Well, if you haven’t used it yet, this post is for you:

1. Message BrowsingAll the information you ever wanted, now at a click’s distance.

Before Visual Debugger, if you wanted to see the contents of the payload at each point you had to clutter your mule configuration with loggers all over the place, well, those days are over. Just put in a breakpoint et voilà!

You can also edit most values dynamically at runtime by clicking them.

Janet Revell on Monday, June 10, 2013

10 Little Mule Studio Gems

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Every so often, while using , I come across clever little gems that our team thoughtfully inserted into the product to improve usability. These gems don’t get a lot of fanfare, nor do they often warrant much attention on their own, but put together, they make for a smoother, intuitive user experience. Nearly invisible, they have become nearly indispensable to me.

 

#1 Wrap in and Extract to

is an ever-present concern for IT. It can be a rather daunting area when one considers all of the different possible dangers and the large variety of solutions to address them. But, the aim of Enterprise Security really just boils down to establishing and maintaining various levels of access control. Mule itself has always facilitated secure message processing both at the level of the transport, the service layer and of the message . Mule configurations can include all that Spring Security has to offer giving, for example, easy access to an LDAP server for authentication and authorisation. On top of that Mule Applications can apply WS-Security thus facilitating, for example, the validation of  incoming SAML messages. But in this post, rather than delve into all the details of the very extensive security feature set , I would rather approach the subject by considering the primary concerns that drive the need for security in a Service Oriented Architecture, how the industry as a whole has addressed those concerns, the consequent emergence of popular technologies based on this Industrial best practice and finally, the implementation of these technologies in Mule. 

At MuleSoft, we’ve been saying for years that point-to-point integration is evil. With time to market measured in minutes or hours, point-to-point integration projects measured in man-years are headed the way of the Dodo. And the no-software no-hardware model of iPaaS promises to shrink time to market even more.

But how fast can you deploy an enterprise-grade integration from scratch? We’re setting out to break preconceived notions of time to market with the 15-minute integration. Like the 4-minute mile before Roger Bannister, the 15-minute integration sounds like a myth. So is it for real?

When we started working on the Mule High Availability () solution we wanted to create the simplest and most complete ESB HA solution out there. With Mule 3.4 we have further enhanced the capabilities of the Mule HA solution. In this blog post we would like to share with you some details about some of the the following highlight HA features of Mule 3.4:

  • Dynamic Scale Out
  • Unicast Cluster Discovery
  • Distributed Locking
  • Concurrent File Processing