Category: Tech Ramblings

Here’s our weekly roundup of the top 5 integration and API articles of the week.  Take a look, let us know if we missed any, and share your thoughts in the comments.  Don’t forget to follow @MuleSoft to stay up-to-date on integration & APIs!

5 hybrid IT roles your business needs to succeed in 2014

It’s clear that 2014 will be dominated by the integration of big data analytics, cloud computing, mobile, and social media into the enterprise. But what are the best IT roles to push this shift?

  

 The Industrial Enterprise Internet of Things

Data is business and businesses themselves are data streams. Every aspect of the business represents a quantifiable piece of data. Welcome to the Industrial Enterprise Internet of Things.

 

Priya Sony on Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Choosing a Cloud Integration Solution

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What to Consider

A little overview

Top business drivers across organizations manage IT projects that include SaaS to SaaS and SaaS to on-premises integration requirements. In the past, many of these businesses were able to overcome their integration challenges by implementing custom point-to-point integration. Now however, with more and more applications and data being run and managed in the cloud, point-to-point integration can’t keep up with business demands.

Selecting an integration technology to replace point-to-point integration, whether it be a tool or a complete platform, plays a critical role in the success of your business. Businesses should carefully consider a solution to solve SaaS and SOA IT projects, making sure all integration needs are met.

Damian Sima on Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Working with Certificates

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As you probably know, one of the most common ways to secure communications over a networks is the use of certificates. And although this is a great way to secure things, it can also be a pain.
In this post, I’ll share with you all a list of some of the most commons things encountered while working with certificates. I will also show you how to leverage certificates when working with Mule ESB. Finally, I’ll show you a quick hack that may save you some time when you are in a hurry.

Now what’s a keystore?

Java is shipped with the KeyTool, which is nothing more than a command line tool that allows you to create keystores. A keystore is the “secure” repository that Java uses to store the certificates. It’s basically a file that holds certificates, this file is what you’ll hock to you Java app so it knows how to encrypt and decrypt the messages.

Here on the blog, we’ve been talking a great deal  about APIs and the importance of designing, publishing, and managing them. You’ve heard about RAML and APIkit, and you’ve heard about RAML and APIkit working together to help design and implement better APIs.

Today, MuleSoft announced a new release of the Anypoint Platform for APIs, a design-first approach to designing, building, and managing APIs through a single and unified solution! The Anypoint Platform for APIs makes it easy for developers, architects, and businesses owners to deliver successful APIs with:

Well it worked for Motorcycle Maintenance and Archery…

After the deal had been signed, requirements were drawn up, everybody went through training, and all the software had been download, the developers and architects new to Mule ESB often puzzle themselves with this question, “Ok, what do I do now?” With all the tools and options provided by our products, taking that proverbial first step toward go-live Nirvana can indeed come across as a daunting task for Mule implementation virgins. As the pseudo-scholar of Eastern Religions, a doctor of philosophy, as well as the most monkish employee at MuleSoft, I hope to illustrate how meditating on Zen principles can help get implementations started and bring good karma to successful project completions.

Shohil Kothari on Thursday, January 16, 2014

Top Posts from 2013

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2013 brought massive shifts in integration tech, from APIs to SaaS and everything in between. Check out our most popular blog posts of 2013 to get a sense of the landscape and what 2014 might bring.

The Hunt for the Perfect API

Your API can be a key to your company’s success. Get it wrong and you lose out on a big opportunity. So how do you design a great API? Is there such a thing? What does it look like?

dillon.compton on Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Minding the API Hierarchy of Needs

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The rising popularity of APIs as an architectural and development pattern has driven a massive shift in how we think about application and systems design; but how are we thinking about APIs themselves? As API adoption increases, we need to learn how to mitigate risk, maximize utility, and ensure we are building the right APIs for the right people.

Reza Shafii, Director of Product Management, introduces the API Hierarchy of Needs in his InfoQ article, “Minding the API Hierarchy of Needs with RAML and APIkit“, and discusses the advantage of a holistic, broadly inclusive approach to API initiatives.

You may have already heard that on December 31st, 2013, Snapchat was hacked and  4.6MM records were subsequently compromised. According to the official blog, “an attacker released a database of partially redacted phone numbers and usernames.” It turns out the hacker(s) had exploited the “Find Friends” API to try to return the username of automatically generated phone number combinations.

In this case, only phone numbers and usernames were released. Pretty harmless, right? Not quite. The most substantial loss that Snapchat faces in this situation is the loss of trust. Snapchat, along with other organizations that have faced similar challenges, will ultimately recover and fix flaws to become stronger than ever before.

Skip the hampers and gift cards and give the developers on your team something useful this holiday season to transform their hard-earned skills into something creative.


Raspberry Pi

Way better than Fruitcake, Raspberry Pi is a credit-card-sized single-board computer running Linux that can be used for all kinds of great ideas from running a web server in your pocket to building home automation systems. We used one to fly helicopters using a fitness wristband device at our last MuleSoft hackathon. You can get one here for less than $50.

Picture cool kids in startups, cranking code as if their lives depend on it, focusing on the proverbial MVP above all else. At this stage, who cares if technical debt accumulates as fast as code gets written? It would be a waste of time and focus to try to keep the field as green as it was initially. Then the worst happens: the cool kids have it right, people love their new app and traffic starts to surge. Though strong, the duct tape that olds the application together starts to show signs of fatigue. Maintenance becomes painful, adding new features is excruciating. The blood of the architecture that has been sacrificed on the altar of time-to-market is calling for revenge.

One of the most typical architectural mishap that comes back to haunt startups is tight coupling: the whole system is a monolith where coupling manifests itself both from a temporal manner (everything is synchronous) and a lack of abstraction in the interactions between the subsystems (everything knows the intimate details of everything else).

The good news is that there is hope: the giants of past time, upon whose shoulders everything is built, have fought these problems and won. Take Hohpe/Woolf’s Enterprise Integration Patterns (EIP) for example. They discuss how messaging can be used to alleviate coupling issues. Sure enough, the “enterprise” term in the name is dubbed “run away!” by our startups’ cool kids. So in this post we’ll look at a few of these patterns and how they could be used beneficially in modern applications. And hopefully these patterns will feel more lovely than enterprisey!