We put a lot of effort in Mule 3.3 to improve error handling in Mule ESB. One of the most common requirements during error handling was the ability to continue processing the same message that was being processed at the time of the exception. And that’s why that is the default behavior for the new exception strategies shipped with Mule 3.3.

Another very common use case was the need to differentiate between handled and unhandled exceptions within a flow. In this case we are going to focus on handled exception and the new catch exception strategy.

ryan.carter on Thursday, August 23, 2012

Connector Callback Testing – Local

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Testing using an external API can be a PITA, especially if the API uses any HTTP Callbacks or redirects such as OAuth or WebHooks. If your using any callback functionality like this then the Service Provider needs a way to callback your application and therefore be accessible to the public Internet.

When you start integrating these APIs, it’s much easier to work on your local development machine, but these are usually behind firewalls, NAT, or are otherwise not able to provide a public URL and it’s not really feasible to push to a staging environment every time you want to test something.

So we need a way to make our local applications available to the Internet; there are a few good services and tools out there to help with this such as: Tunnlr, ProxyLocal, showoff.io or you can setup your own reverse SSH Tunnel if you already have a remote system to forward you requests.

In this post, I am going to use a service called LocalTunnel and show how we can share a local Mule application with the world and customize some Cloud Connectors to receive Callbacks locally.

Nial Darbey on Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Welcome to Mule Enterprise

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Introduction


Those of you who are regular visitors to this blog are no doubt familiar with Mule Community edition. With this blog I’d like to introduce you to MuleSoft and our Enterprise version of Mule, I think its important to understand everything that mule can offer you.

Reason for Success

So why do companies rely so heavily on Mule? Well, consider the legacy integration ESBs and Brokers. Most of them were built over fifteen years ago, so they solve only a subset of todays integration challenges. These were and remain heavyweight stacks expensive to rollout and maintain and stubbornly resistent to change. MuleSoft in stark contrast is now leading the way with Mule Enterprise which was built to be agile in its ability to adapt to the changes which necessarily occur in any company’s business processes.  Mule’s success can be attributed to the following characteristics:

One aspect of Mule DataMapper that makes it a grate data integration tool is its ability to do mappings involving complex and different data structures (XML, Json, POJOs, CSV, Excel files and more). One feature that is really attractive is the possibility to test your mappings without the need to launch your Mule application, so that you can provide sample input data and preview what the result of the DataMapper will be.

After reading this post you should be able to:

  • Understand how to add and use Input Arguments
  • Test your mappings with the Preview Functionality

We’ve just rolled out a new platform service in our CloudHub R20 release for storing application data. With Mule’s Object Store capabilities, each CloudHub integration application is given it’s own storage, with zero configuration required. This makes it a extremely easy to implement two very important integration scenarios:

  1. Persisting OAuth tokens – all our OAuth enabled connectors can store tokens and restore them using ObjectStores
  2. Storing synchronization state – your application may need to keep track of the last record synchronized, so the next time it synchronizes it can resume where it left off

In addition, you can store any other data you want in it as well! Let’s take a more in depth look at these scenarios.

The configuration patterns series continues with this new installment!

We’re happy to announce that a new configuration pattern made its way into Mule 3.3. This new pattern, named HTTP Proxy, will come in handy when remote web resources need to be accessed in a controlled manner, for example when it is not desirable to have numerous internal applications depend directly on external services.

It also supports caching, which allows you to reduce the outbound traffic towards regularly (and of course cacheable) web resources.

Following the recent release of Mule 3.3.0, I’m happy to announce the related releases of five community transports: AMQP, PubSubHubbub, Redis, Erlang and JCR.

With these new versions available, you’ll be able to benefit immediately from the new features of Mule 3.3.0.

Scalability, Reliability, High Performance:  Your business demands it, Mule’s High Availability solution delivers.  See why five of the world’s top 10 banks trust Mule to run their business.  Join Muley’s Pablo La Greca and Ramiro Rinaudo for a live demonstration of the core components in MuleSoft’s robust High Availability solution.

Mule HA

Highlights include:

  • Setting up a cluster using the Mule Management Console
  • Deploying an application to the cluster
  • Demonstration of node failure when processing requests
  • Demonstration of cluster recovery with zero message loss
  • Discussion of the benefits of Mule’s Data Grid 

Presenters:

This tutorial is the second in a series of blog posts that explain how to integrate Mule and Social Media.

Today’s post will focus on connecting to Facebook and updating your status on facebook.
Other posts to expect will integratie Mule and:

Myself and Dave recently spoke a different events about Real-time APIs and use cases.  Folks have been asking for the slides and video, so here they are!

Real-time APIs: Don’t call us, we’ll call you

The number of real-time APIs on the Web are rising. What the heck are real-time APIs, how are they used? How are they built? This deck and demo was presented at CloudMafia in San Francisco.