Tag: DevKit

Mariano Gonzalez on Wednesday, August 28, 2013

OAuth 2 just got a bit easier

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Ever since Devkit made its first entry into the Mule family, a big variety of OAuth enabled Connectors were made available. Salesforce, Facebook, Twitter, Dropbox, LinkedIn and Google Apps suite are just some examples of the APIs we’ve connected to using that support.

When we started thinking about the August 2013 release we decided to take it one step forward and make it easier than ever. And now that Mule 3.5-andes is available on CloudHub, you’ll be able to leverage all these improvements into your integrations. On Premise users will also be able to use when the final version of Mule 3.5.0 is released as GA.

Anyone that has used to write a Mule extension and then wanted to add it to Studio, may have notice that the extension will appear under the Connectors category in the palette. This is not a problem when the extension is actually a Cloud Connector, but is sort of a problem when it was something else (for example a component like the LDAP connector). This is not an issue anymore since DevKit 3.3.2, as you can now use the @Category annotation at class definition level (Connector or Module) to select under which category you want your extension to be listed in:

Google Apps offers a cloud alternative to many of the office products.  If you have a Gmail account then you have Google Apps including Spreadsheets, Docs, Presentations, Contacts, Calendars and Tasks.  Of course Google Apps have APIS and of course we have the connectors to make it easy to connect Google Apps and your applications together.  Lets get the connectors and then take a look at what you can do.

Today I would like to talk a little bit about releasing a new version of your Mule extensions.  As you may know Mule is a an extensible platform with well defined integration points for plugging in your own connectors transformations, components and even routers. Suppose you have used The Mule Devkit to create your very own extension or cloud connector, and your project is so cool that it was accepted on MuleForge.

What happens if you make changes to you project and it moves from version 1.0 to 1.1? We’ll take a very quick look at how to do that in this post.

First, modify your pom.xml to increase your version number. In this case, we’ll go from 1.0 to 1.1:

<groupId>org.mule.modules</groupId>
<artifactId>cool-connector</artifactId>
<version>1.1</version>
<packaging>mule-module</packaging>

    

Mark Zuckenberg once said: “How can you connect the world if you leave out China”. Well, I now hereby say: “How can you connect the cloud if you leave out Google”. I know I don’t have his net worth, but I have a point nevertheless. Reality is that Google has done a great job building a Gazillion of different and very cool APIs and you’d be right to feel that it’s hard to keep their pace. To help you with that is that we proudly present to you the first release of the Google Connectors Suite.

Mule’s extension capabilities multiply its power as an integration platform and range from simple expressions to custom cloud connectors: wherever a configuration value is expected, expressions can be applied in various languages, including our new Mule Expression Language, so that the same value is calculated at run-time; our Scripting processors allow you to execute custom logic in Groovy, Python, Ruby, JavaScript, PHP and indeed any language which implements the JSR-223 scripting spec for the JVM; and of course Java components can be invoked too. Our extensible platform goes even further with the addition of custom Cloud Connectors with already over a hundred to choose from. These greatly simplify any interaction with a public API whether it be exposed on the cloud or on-premise. They come with connection-pooling and automated reconnection strategies.

Ramiro Rinaudo on Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Announcing Mule ESB 3.3.1

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Mule ESB 3.3.1 represents a significant amount of effort on the back of Mule ESB 3.3 and our happiness with the result is multiplied by the number of products that are part of this release. We are releasing new versions with multiple enhancements and bug fixes to all of the major stack components in our Enterprise Edition. This includes:

The is a tool for accelerating the development of Mule extensions. A popular Mule extension is what we call a Connector. A Cloud Connector provides Mule with the ability to receive and send messages to/from a cloud service provider. We do not make assumptions about whether that service provider is a REST-based service, a SOAP endpoint or a custom protocol on top of TCP. Having said that, we do offer certain services for some types of service providers. In this post I’m going to be talking about connection management, a feature in the DevKit that provides management and sharing of connections for those service providers that have stateful protocols.

Less than a month ago we released the 3.0 and we are on a roll here. Just in case you are jumping onto the bandwagon a little late, the is a tool for authoring Mule extensions. The model is quite easy. First you write a POJO, then you annotate your POJO with Mule concepts and then when you run on the code you authored it will generate all the needed boiler plate code including a Mule-compatible schema. Sounds exciting, isn’t it? Unfortunately this blog post is all about whats change since the last release, but if you want to learn more you can do so at our website here.

We added several features in this release but to keep this blog post short I will cover just a few of them.

john.demic on Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Implementing a Circuit Breaker with DevKit

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One of my favorite patterns from Michael Nygard’s excellent Release It! is the Circuit Breaker.  A is an automatic switch that stops the flow of electricity in the event of a failure.  This sort of behavior is also useful when integrating with remote systems.

We might want to stop message delivery on an outbound-endpoint after a certain exception is thrown. A remote system under load or the target of a denial-of-service attach is a good example.  In this scenario it would be nice to automatically stop delivery  for a certain period of time to not exacerbate the situation.