Tag: maven

juan.cavallotti on Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Building Mule Apps With Gradle

0

Gradle Logo

Gradle is gaining more and more popularity as a system. It combines the power of scripting with the simplicity of conventions. Declarative builds are very straightforward, where customizations do not end up in tons of messy configurations.

Currently, Mule has two ways of building projects:

  • Apps can be built through Mule Studio, which is simple by nature but not very friendly with continuous integration, source control management and related tools.
  • The recommended way to manage your build is with Maven and the  Mule Maven plugin. This plugin is integrated with Mule Studio and has a lot of power on its own.

Now the open source has presented a brand new way of building Mule apps with Gradle. The project aims to provide a very simple way to build Mule apps that is friendly with continuous integration and can work easily with . One of the interesting things about Gradle is that it can reduce over 90% the complexity of the build if we compare it with the same build based on Maven.

alberto.pose on Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Introducing the NPM Maven Plugin

2

Introduction

Suppose that you have a Maven project and you want to download Node.js modules previously uploaded to NPM. One way of doing that without running is by using the npm-maven-plugin. It allows the user to download the required Node modules without running node.js: It is completely implemented on the JVM.

Getting Started

First of all you will need to add the Mule Maven repo to you pom.xml file:

After doing that, you will need to add the following to the ->plugin section of your pom.xml file:

Mule’s extension capabilities multiply its power as an integration platform and range from simple expressions to custom cloud connectors: wherever a configuration value is expected, expressions can be applied in various languages, including our new Mule Expression Language, so that the same value is calculated at run-time; our Scripting processors allow you to execute custom logic in Groovy, Python, Ruby, PHP and indeed any language which implements the JSR-223 scripting spec for the JVM; and of course Java components can be invoked too. Our extensible platform goes even further with the addition of custom Cloud Connectors with already over a hundred to choose from. These greatly simplify any interaction with a public API whether it be exposed on the cloud or on-premise. They come with connection-pooling and automated reconnection strategies.

As you probably already heard we launched Mule iON this week. If you ask one of our marketing guys what iON is, he will tell you that is the first cloud-based integration platform. iON will enable you to integrate popular SaaS applications, cloud services, social media, and a lot more without requiring any infrastructure.

Of course, I’m not a marketing guy, I’m a software developer. So my description is: “iON is awesome. It’s Mule on the cloud, and you are totally going to dig it”. Also, since I’m a software developer, I will put my money were my mouth is and I will show you how to something incredible in a couple of minutes. Thats right! A few minutes and thats taking into account your learning curve of Mule iON.

Dirk Olmes on Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Pack up and go!

1

In order to use the hot deployment feature that was introduced with Mule 3 you need to package your application as a zip file.

If you are using Maven to your Mule applications then packaging zip files for is very easy. All you need is to declare your packaging to be Mule:

We’re pleased to announce the immediate availability of our newest release of Tcat Server 6. This new release includes many fixes, in addition to bundling the Apache Software Foundation’s official release binaries of the newest Tomcat release, version 6.0.26.

Here is a summary of the changes and fixes that are included in the new version of Tomcat, since our last release of Tcat Server 6: