Tag: Mule Studio

Recently, I discussed how to build mule integrations using Gradle. This is a follow up post to discuss work with this plugin and mule studio, and to discuss some relevant enterprise features. This post assumes you already know how to do the basic setup of the plugin (discussed on my previous post), so if you have not done it before, please go ahead and read it before continuing.

gradle and mule

Creating a Project

From your gradle project, you can easily change it to a Mule Studio type just by applying the ‘mulestudio’ plugin and selecting the appropriate mule version, here is an example:

Now you can simply run ‘gradle studio’ from the command line and it will create the necessary files so you can import the project into your workspace.

All Demo, No Slides

Mule Studio makes it easy for developers to hybrid integration applications. In our latest webinar, I’ll walk you through a on build a complete integration scenario and deploy it on a local machine on-premises, as well as to CloudHub. And what’s the point of building a hybrid integration application if you can’t manage it? I’ll then demonstrate the runtime management and monitoring capabilities available on the Anypoint Platform.

Back in the old days when I used to write SaaS integration apps for living (long time ago, like 2 months back…) I always found it somehow difficult to reconcile large datasets with the Anypoint Cloud Connectors. Don’t get me wrong, I love those connectors! They solve a lot of issues for me, from actually dealing with the API to handle security and reconnection. However, there’re use cases in which you want to retrieve large amounts of data from a Cloud Connectors (let’s say retrieve my 600K Salesforce contacts and put them in a CSV file). You just can’t pass that amount of information in one single API call, not to even mention that you’ll most likely won’t even be able to hold all of those contacts in memory. All of these puts you in a situation in which you will need to get the information in pages.

In the past, as now, Mule ESB follows a release schedule that introduces a new version of our industry-leading ESB software every 9 – 12 months, supplemented with maintenance releases approximately every 6 months. Though this cadence fit very tightly with the demands of our customers who deploy Mule on premises, we came to realize that our customers deploying Mule to were much more flexible in terms of updating versions of software, and were more eager to take advantage of new features and functionality.

I’m no psychic but I bet you two things: This holiday you already took a bunch of pictures that went straight into facebook and you drank A LOT. Now you’ll probably edit your photos in the morning, but it seems a shame to lose those drunken shots.  What if you could save them? Let’s see how you can do that using Mule. We’ll see how we can make an app that pulls all our photos and upload them into box.

Janet Revell on Tuesday, December 25, 2012

Merry Christmas!

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We got you something special for Christmas this year.

We didn’t have time to wrap it, but we know you’re going to love it. We’re so excited to see the look on your face when you [download and] unpack your shiny, new -based IDE.  That’s right, we got you a brand new Mule Studio!

 

‘Twas the day after Christmas and all through the house, not a creature was stirring, because they were all playing with video games, smart phones, e-gadgets, and iParaphenalia.  If you’re already in the mindset of playing with a new toy, why not explore the world of Mule Studio?  It’s free, it takes a just a few minutes to download, and you can whip through our Getting Started guide in the time it takes drink another round of eggnog.

We are excited to announce the availability of the first early preview release of Mule Studio 3.4. This release is aligned with the release of the Mule ESB CE Milestone 2 to the community.

We are making this release of Studio available to the Mule community to get valuable feedback on our latest and greatest features. This blog post contains text and video introductions to the freshly-baked features included in this release.

As you read through this post and try the Studio features, please keep in mind that this is a pre-Beta version. Explore, discover and play, but do not use it to develop Mule apps for use in production.

Ross Mason on Monday, December 10, 2012

One Studio

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Integration is becoming such a critical part of application development that we spend many of our cycles on making Mule easier for any developer to use. Mule Studio was built to address the needs of developers who don’t wake up every morning thinking about integration.

If you have used Mule in the last year there is a good chance that you have used Mule Studio.  It is an Eclipsed based development environment for building Mule applications either visually or using the XML DSL (with full two-way editing).   Mule Studio has become the preferred on-ramp to working with Mule. Of course if you prefer to hack in a text editor Mule continues to embrace Maven for command-line development.

To fight XSS attacks, the web browser imposes the same origin policy for HTTP requests made by JavaScript code:

But there are a lot of use cases where this kind of cross domain HTTP request is desired, so developers came up with some workarounds:

  • Server side proxy: the idea is to avoid cross domain requests in the browser by doing them on the server:To do that in Mule you can use the HTTP proxy pattern as explained in this post.

Mule’s extension capabilities multiply its power as an integration platform and range from simple expressions to custom cloud connectors: wherever a configuration value is expected, expressions can be applied in various languages, including our new Mule Expression Language, so that the same value is calculated at run-time; our Scripting processors allow you to execute custom logic in Groovy, Python, Ruby, JavaScript, PHP and indeed any language which implements the JSR-223 scripting spec for the JVM; and of course Java components can be invoked too. Our extensible platform goes even further with the addition of custom Cloud Connectors with already over a hundred to choose from. These greatly simplify any interaction with a public API whether it be exposed on the cloud or on-premise. They come with connection-pooling and automated reconnection strategies.